FAQ

 

ARTWORK SETUP

What file formats do we accept?

We accept Illustrator, Photoshop files however our most preferred method is press ready PDF files. If providing Ind, AI, or PSD files please outline text, flatten artwork and embed any linked files. All you need to do is provide us with your Press Ready artwork and we can print it for you. All our standard product prices online include GST and include delivery to one location within Australia.

STANDARD FORMATTING REQUIREMENTS

Print 4 Less requires all customer art files meet the following formatting criteria before being uploaded:
  1. All art files must be converted to CYMK
  2. All art file elements (graphic images, photographs, etc) must have a minimum resolution of 300 DPI (Dots Per Inch).
  3. All images and fonts must be embedded or outlined.
  4. Minimum 3mm bleeds must be created for graphic images or photographs extendingto edge of the trim size. Please allow an 3mm margin for text and images approaching the the trim size to prevent page elements from being cut off.
  5. Please create art files to finished size (including bleeds when applicable).
  6. Please ensure all files have the relevant print cut marks
ACCEPTED FILE FORMATS
  1. Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) – Preferred minimum 300 DPI with 3mm Bleed
  2. Adobe Illustrator (.ai)
  3. Adobe InDesign (.indd)
Please ensure that artwork files are not locked or password protected

Can I send you native files that have been created in Word or Power Point?

Sorry, the answer is no. The files we prefer to take are Press Ready PDF files.

What is the difference between full colour and 4 colour process products?

Full colour and 4 colour process mean the same thing. Both mean it is printed in standard CMYK process.

Why do certain colours look different from a re-print?

There are many possible factors that can affect the colour on your printed materials. The weather outside can play a part in affecting how the ink dries on the paper, and can change the colour slightly. The ink density and constant on-press fluctuations in colour, printing press running temperature or blanket wear, may also affect colour slightly. It is impossible to expect any professional printer to produce exactly the same printed blue on two separate days.

What is the difference between the RGB and CMYK colour space?

RGB refers to the primary colours of light, Red, Green and Blue, that are used in monitors, television screens, digital cameras and scanners. CMYK refers to the primary colours of pigment used by commercial printers: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. These are the inks used on the press in '4-colour process printing', commonly referred to as 'full colour printing'. Commercial printers cannot print in RGB your files should be converted to CMYK before providing them to us.

How well will my job match what I see on my monitor?

Due to wide differences in monitor calibration and the different technologies used, some printed colours may not exactly match the colours on your specific monitor. We recommend using the Pantone colour system when selecting colours for your jobs. â–¶

4 Colour Black vs BLACK100% Black's are not always black... there are different breakdowns to make different black's. Below are our recommendations. We do not recommend more than 300% total ink density.

1

What is bleed?

Bleed is a term used to describe an overflow of artwork beyond the artwork size (or trim size). This bleed will be later trimmed off for a flush finish. We ask for artwork and designs to be supplied with bleed of a minimum of 2mm.

â–¶ How do I add bleed to my InDesign File?
  1. Set up a new document to the exact file size of the product you are ordering. E.g.: A4 Letterheads, your document would be 210x297mm but select 2mm bleed in your document setup options.
  2. Any colour or images that you want to go right to the edge of the product need to be placed into your design, but also get them to spill over onto your artboard (white space surrounding your document) by at least 2mm.
  3. Keep all type at least 3mm from the edge of your document.
  4. Save your document as you normally do.
  5. File > Export, and choose Adobe PDF from the list of save options. Name your file and choose 'Save', Save Adobe PDF box will now appear, choose the following:
    • Adobe PDF preset, should be on 'Press'
    • Select 'Marks & Bleeds' from the left hand column,
    • Tick 'trim marks'

â–¶ How do I add bleed to my Adobe Photoshop file?

Set up a new document 2mm bigger all round than the size of the product you are ordering. E.g.: A4 Letterheads, your document would be 214 x 301mm.
  1. Put guides around your document at 2mm from the top, bottom, left and right. This outside space is your bleed, and inside the margins is your printed document.
  2. Any colour or images that you want to go right to the edge of the product need to be placed into your design, but also get them to spill over onto your outer margins or bleed area.
  3. Keep all type at least 3mm from the inside guide in your document. (So from the outside edge of the page, type will be sitting no closer that 5mm).
  4. Save your document as you normally do.
  5. Flatten the layers and do a 'Save As' (name accordingly so we will be able to link your file to your job).
  6. Send us this file.
â–¶ How do I add bleed to my Adobe Illustrator file?
  1. Set up a new document to the exact file size of the product you are ordering. E.g.: A4 Letterheads, your document would be 210 x 297mm.
  2. Any colour or images that you want to go right to the edge of the product need to be placed into your design, but also get them to spill over onto your artboard (white space surrounding your document) by at least 2mm.
  3. Keep all type at least 3mm from the edge of your document.
  4. Save your document as you normally do.
Now do a 'Save As' and choose Adobe PDF from the list of save options. Name your file and choose 'Save', Save Adobe PDF box will now appear, choose the following: * Adobe PDF preset, should be on 'Press Quality' * Select 'Marks & Bleeds' from the left hand column, tick 'trim marks', in the 'Bleeds' section below, add 2mm into top, bottom, left and right space. * Leave everything else as is.

Do I have to put bleed on?

Yes all files must be provided with bleed. If no bleed is provided uneven white card/paper will still be visible on your final result. Not putting bleed on your document will not prevent your job from being printed.

Why do fonts need to be created to outlines?

Fonts need to be created to outlines to prevent any defaulting from occurring when we open your file. Essentially what you have just done is told the program to not see the type as being part of a font face, but instead to see it as a graphic element.

Can you design my job for me?

Yes, we can - please click send in your request by email sales@print4less.com.au

COLOUR

Pantone Matching System PMS

A system of colour that ensures repeatable mixing of specific spot colour inks no matter where or on what stock the job is printed. Typically a printer will show a customer a PMS book in order to choose a specific spot colour, identified by a number, which is to be used in their print job. The book also contains information on the exact measurements of component inks required to reproduce that colour.

FOUR COLOUR PROCESS FULL COLOUR CMYK

This is the standard printing method that uses the four process colours of Cyan (C), Magenta (M), Yellow (Y) and Black (K). These four inks are combined in varying percentages to create a broader spectrum of colour.

What is the difference between full colour and 4 colour process products?

Full colour and 4 colour process mean the same thing. Both mean it is printed in standard CMYK process.

Why do certain colours look different from a re-print?

There are many possible factors that can affect the colour on your printed materials. The weather outside can play a part in affecting how the ink dries on the paper, and can change the colour slightly. The ink density and constant on-press fluctuations in colour, printing press running temperature or blanket wear, may also affect colour slightly. It is impossible to expect any professional printer to produce exactly the same printed blue on two separate days.

What is the difference between the RGB and CMYK colour space?

RGB refers to the primary colours of light, Red, Green and Blue, that are used in monitors, television screens, digital cameras and scanners. CMYK refers to the primary colours of pigment used by commercial printers: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. These are the inks used on the press in '4-colour process printing', commonly referred to as 'full colour printing'. Commercial printers cannot print in RGB your files should be converted to CMYK before providing them to us.

How well will my job match what I see on my monitor?

Due to wide differences in monitor calibration and the different technologies used, some printed colours may not exactly match the colours on your specific monitor. We recommend using the Pantone colour system when selecting colours for your jobs.

4 Colour Black vs BLACK100%

Black's are not always black... there are different breakdowns to make different black's. Below are our recomendations. We do not recommend more than 300% total ink density.1

GLOSSARY

Vector Image

A computer image that uses mathematical descriptions of paths and fills to define the graphic, as opposed to individual pixels. Can be scaled to any size without loss of quality.

TIF or TIFF

Stands for Tagged Image File Format and is the preferred file format used for bitmap images in the graphics industry. The best format to use when you don't want to lose quality in your image.

Spot Colours

These colours are usually printed as solid areas and used when fewer than four colours are needed or when the four-colour process (CMYK) is unable to accurately reproduce a colour. A spot colour is usually based on a standard PMS colour which is a premixed Ink.

Set-Off

The accidental transfer of the printed image from one sheet to the back of the sheet above it.

Scoring

Heavy card weight stock can get unsightly bumps when folded. To prevent this a score is made along the fold line using a scoring wheel on the printing press. A shallow indentation is thus made ensuring the item folds neatly.

Saddle Stitch

A method of binding where the folded pages are stitched through the spine from the outside, using wire staples. Usually limited to about 64 pages.

RGB

A colour model using red, green, and blue - the additive primary colours. Computer monitors and televisions use RGB data to create screen images.

Resolution

The quality of a graphic file is measured by the number of pixels or dots per inch (dpi) the image contains. A high resolution file might typically be 300 dpi and is suitable for printing jobs. A 72 dpi image is considered to be a low resolution image and is useful for website design. The image resolution changes as you scale the picture up and down in your graphics program.

Rasterization / Ratserizing

Changing vector-type image information to raster image information.

Process Colour

The process colours (Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black) are used in traditional colour printing to reproduce a full colour range.

Prepress

The process of getting an image ready to go on press. Digital prepress denotes the entire preparation of a digital file for printing in either a digital or conventional system.

Pre Flighting

A process of checking a job for possible problems before the job is sent for final output. This process is used to find problems such as missing fonts, postscript errors and colour problems.

Postscript

A digital page description language used by laser printers and some inkjet printers and colour copiers. When you print to a postscript printer, the printer turns the page layout into a series of commands which the printer translates into toner on paper. Only postscript printers can print EPS graphics and Postscript fonts. Most consumer printing devices do not support Postscript as it is really only necessary for use with printing industry applications.

Portrait

The orientation of a page so that the longest edge is vertical.

Perfect Binding

A common method of binding paperback books. After the printed sections have been collated, the spines will be ground off and the cover glued on. The finished product is then trimmed flush with the cover.

PDF

Portable Document Format. An electronic document format from Adobe that allows the distribution of digital files across any operating system or platform. Displays a document as originally designed and formatted without having the original software application or fonts on the viewing computer.

Pantone Matching System PMS

A system of colour that ensures repeatable mixing of specific spot colour inks no matter where or on what stock the job is printed. Typically a printer will show a customer a PMS book in order to choose a specific spot colour, identified by a number, which is to be used in their print job. The book also contains information on the exact measurements of component inks required to reproduce that colour.

Native Files

The original computer files in their original application file format as opposed to an exported file format such as postscript print to disk format or pdf format.

Moire

An undesirable effect that appears on printed pictures that were scanned from an already printed source. It appears as a regular pattern or clumping of colours. A moire pattern is created by the juxtaposition of two repetitive graphic structures, e.g. rows of dots (as with halftone screens) intersecting at an angle.

Midtones

Tones in an image that are in the middle of the tonal range, between the lightest (highlights) and darkest (shadows) areas.

Metallic Inks

Gold and silver semi-reflective inks used for special effects in print design. In most cases should be printed on coated gloss art stock or high gloss cast coated otherwise the ink is absorbed into the stock leaving a dull lustre finish.

Make Ready

The process in getting an offset press ready for printing.

Landscape

The orientation of a page so that the longest edge is horizontal.

JPG or JPEG

Joint Photographic Experts Group. Standardised image compression format developed by the Joint Photographic Experts Group. Used for compressing full colour and greyscale images. The standard format for digital camera files.

Imposition

The arrangement of pages on a printed sheet, which when the sheet is finally printed on both sides, folded and trimmed, will place the pages in their correct order.

Greyscale

A bitmap image format that containing shades of grey values as opposed to only pure black and pure white. This format is used for single colour usually black photographs and images. There are 256 possible values of grey from white to pure black.

EPS

Stands for Encapsulated Postscript. An EPS is a graphics file format that can contain vector and bitmap information. An EPS consists of a 'header graphic' which is the part you see in your software program, and the postscript information that contains the data for all the objects contained in the file. EPS files can only be printed to a Postscript Printer. If you print and EPS to a non-Postscript printer only the low resolution header graphic will print.

Drill

If your printing job has to be put in a 3 ring binder or needs to be hung on a shop display you need some hole 'drilled' into it. The machine used to do this is very similar to the drill presses used in other industrial situations.

CTP

A plate setter is a device used to make printing plates for presses. CTP stands for Computer To Plate. No film is used in the product of CTP.

Colour Proof

A colour sample that attempts to represent the final printed image that will result when a piece is offset printed. Colour proofs can be generated from film separations prior to using the separations to make printing plates.

Coated Stock

A printing paper or card manufactured with a transparent, smooth layer added to one or both sides that changes the look of the final printing. Coatings are normally defined as gloss, semi-gloss or matt surfaces.

Blanket

A rubber-faced sheet onto which ink is transferred prior to that ink being transferred to the sheet to be printed. The process 'offset' is so called because the ink is picked up by the blanket from the inked plate and then 'offset' or transferred onto the paper.

Art Paper

A smooth coated paper obtained by adding a coating of china clay compound on one or both sides of the paper.

Acrobat

Adobe software product that converts page layouts into a standard format based on the Postscript language. It tranlates text, vector and bitmap information into PDF files which can then be viewed and printed on any machine regardless of platform. A useful format for printers as all images and fonts are contained and compressed in the same file enabling fast transfer over the internet. Files have a .pdf extension.

ORDERING PROCESS

How long will it take to get my order?

Most jobs will be printed within 5 - 10 business days depending on product chosen after you finalise your order. We only use reputable freight companies and depending on your location, should arrive the next working day or up to 3 - 5 days.

Can you print urgent jobs?

Yes we can if it can be digitally printed. We will try and accommodate your request as much as is possible. Always let us know upfront if it is urgent otherwise our standard turnaround times will be given. There may be an increased charge depending on the nature of your job.

What if I need to speak to someone?

We are here because of you, our customers... and while our systems are very user friendly and highly automated, we haven't forgotten that we need to be contactable too. Our extremely helpful staff are only a phone call away on 1300 33 00 50 or email at sales@Print4Less.com.au Print4Less Advertising

CUSTOMER’S RESPONSIBILITY

It is the Customer's responsibility to ensure that the electronic files supplied comply with Print4Less Advertising's file specifications requirements and that the files supplied are correct and able to be printed as soon as they are supplied. Files supplied without bleed will be printed as they are supplied under the assumption that this is the Customer's requirement. It is the Customer's responsibility to ensure that any materials supplied for printing do not breach relevant copyright legislation. Print4Less Advertising accepts no responsibility for any copyright issues. No assumptions or judgements are made by Print4Less Advertising in relation to the correctness or acceptability of any electronic files supplied to us. Electronic files are printed as they are supplied and there will be variations between finished printed products and the same file being printed on various proofing devices (ie. Inkjet printers and the like). Customers must also understand that our printing process will result in colour variations between orders and exact colour matching cannot and will not be provided by Print4Less Advertising . Colour variations will occur from job to job and run to run. Please do not order from Print4Less Advertising if you require an exact colour match or are uncertain with any aspect of your supplied electronic files. Under no circumstances will electronic files be kept by Print4Less Advertising for future use by the Customer. Electronic files must be supplied with each and every order. It is also the Customer's responsibility to understand the nature of the various stocks that we print on and the impact of different finishing options will have on that stock (ie cracking). Print4Less Advertising assumes that its Customers are fully aware of this impact before any orders are placed. Print4Less Advertising accepts no responsibility whatsoever for any cracking caused by folding of brochures or the like. NO REFUNDS OR REPRINTS will be provided for any breaches of the Customer's responsibility contained within this clause.